Roon 1.5 is here!

We’re very pleased to announce our fifth major software update: Roon 1.5. In the four months since we released 1.4, we’ve launched our first hardware products (Nucleus and Nucleus+) and introduced home automation support with Crestron and Control4 modules. As the Roon team continues to grow, the pace of our releases is increasing so we can bring more features to our members more frequently.

Continue reading “Roon 1.5 is here!”

What Makes Nucleus So Special?

We’ve been asked this question about a million times since we announced Nucleus – our first hardware product – last year, so we’ve put together a comprehensive white paper that discusses the concept behind the product, the design decisions that were made during the development process, and the nitty-gritty of the hardware and software technologies we ended up using. This post is an overview of some of that information; if you want the whole story, go read the paper!

Continue reading “What Makes Nucleus So Special?”

Roon Ready Update: September 2017

One of the great features of the Roon Ready program is the diversity of product functions, features, and prices that are represented in the range of available devices from our partners.

From $50 Raspberry Pi hats to $50,000 DACs, table radios to headphone amplifiers, and soundbars to multi-room amps, you can find almost any kind of audio product you need in the Roon Ready family.

Continue reading “Roon Ready Update: September 2017”

Playing well with others

If our experiences at Sooloos and Meridian taught the Roon team anything, it was do what you know. In our case, that means music and software. Sure, we’ve built hardware and shipped mass-market apps, but when your heart’s not in something, it shows.

The spark that inspired the founding of Roon Labs a year ago was the idea that there weren’t great experiences available to people who love music, audio, or both. A few streaming services have made some interesting mobile apps, but those experiences don’t translate well to listening in the home; they often don’t offer reasonable audio quality and they’re designed to be, well, mobile. Conversely, much of the software that’s designed to be used with audio systems leaves quite a bit to be desired in terms of user experience.

Continue reading “Playing well with others”

What a Journey

Fifteen years ago, some friends and I started thinking about how listening to music was going to change. That was 1999, before streaming services or even the iTunes Store, so music collections were made up of CDs and files downloaded from early peer-to-peer networks.

It was a time of tremendous promise. Music, which had long been bound by the physical discs on which it was sold (and the broadcast media which promoted it), was going to become massively accessible. It was an intoxicating thought that all the music in the world might actually be something we could see and hear in our lifetimes.

Continue reading “What a Journey”